Goof Troop, Super Nintendo

Goof Troop is an attempt at a Disney-based Zelda-style game, by famed Japanese developer Capcom. It’s based on a ’90s television series of the same name and was first released in 1993.

The emphasis in Goof Troop is more on solving puzzles than gaining experience or collecting money, and (of course) you play the famous Disney character Goofy, who is the lead character in the TV series. A second player can play simultaneously as Max – Goofy’s sidekick. Max moves more quickly than Goofy, but Goofy can deal more damage to enemies.

Graphically, Goof Troop is wonderful. The characters are all beautifully-drawn and animated, and the backdrops are also clean and colourful. Nothing gets in the way of the gameplay, which consists mostly of finding your way through a maze of screens by locating keys; opening doors; disposing of enemies; and defeating the boss at the end of each level. There are five levels in total: Spoonerville Island beach, a village, a haunted castle, an underground cavern, and a pirate ship (where you must finally defeat the Disney arch villain, Pete).

One interesting thing about Goof Troop is that it was designed by Shinji Mikami – the director of Resident Evil (and its sequels) – and it was one of the first games that he worked on.

Goof Troop is still a great game to play now – particularly two-player. It’s an oft-forgotten SNES and Capcom classic!

More: Goof Troop on Wikipedia

The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap, Game Boy Advance

Released in Japan in 2004 and everywhere else in 2005, The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap was developed by Capcom and Flagship, with Nintendo overseeing the project. The result is: a fantastically fun handheld adventure game, with beautiful 2D graphics and captivating gameplay.

In The Minish Cap, Link makes friends with a talking, magical cap that guides him into a world of monsters and miniaturisation. A miniature race of people, no less, called The Minish. And – as Link explores and makes progress in the game – his powers increase, as does his arsenal of weapons and tools. Just like in every other Zelda game. And – just like every other Zelda game – The Minish Cap is packed with new ideas and game mechanics that make it a joy to play. The ‘Gust Jar’ is one such example: stand on a floating lilypad and shoot it in the opposite direction to which you want to travel.

I’ve always had a soft spot for the look of The Minish Cap. It has the visual appeal of something like A Link To The Past, but with a unique Capcom twist to it. The Minish Cap is a procession of beautifully-drawn (and incredibly colourful) pixel art, from start to finish, and really shows what the GBA is capable of.

Gameplay-wise: there’s little to fault. There are enough dungeons, puzzles, boss fights, and side quests to keep you going for days. Weeks even – depending on how much you like to take your time.

As Zelda games go, I would put The Minish Cap up there with the best of the 2D adventures. It’s a must-play if you like cute and colourful exploration games.

More: The Legend of Zelda: The Minish Cap on Wikipedia

100 Best Level-Grinders Of All-Time on thekingofgrabs.com

100 Best Level-Grinders Of All-Time

Dino Crisis, PlayStation

Dino Crisis was a 1999 PlayStation release for Capcom and features soldiers taking on dinosaurs in a futuristic setting.

It was probably made to cash in on the success of Jurassic Park and plays a bit like an early Resident Evil game. No surprises when you consider that Dino Crisis was made by many of the same team who made the Resident Evil series.

Dino Crisis is pretty good. It’s got a female lead. Maybe too many door entry sequences though? It has sold more than two million copies worldwide, so someone out there certainly loves it…

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dino_Crisis_(video_game)

Breath of Fire II, Super Nintendo

Breath of Fire II is a direct sequel to Breath of Fire, first released in Japan in 1994.

Set 500 years after the events of Breath of Fire, you again assume the role of a young boy called Ryu, this time a descendant of the hero of the first game. You initially begin a quest to clear the name of one of your friends, and this snowballs into something epic.

Like before, Breath of Fire II is a mixture of overworld exploration and turn-based combat – building experience points and raising levels by grinding random combat hotspots. Occasionally you’ll get to fight the odd boss. And even more occasionally you’ll get to recruit new party members.

The graphics and sound are beautiful throughout and the adventuring gathers pace gradually. There is a constant stream of things to do (including fishing), and the combat is also quite hypnotic. Personally: I love this game.

If you like level-grinders you’ll really have to play the first two Breath of Fire games. They are Super Nintendo classics. They’ve also been re-released on the Game Boy Advance.

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breath_of_Fire_II

Breath of Fire, Super Nintendo

Capcom‘s Breath of Fire is the first major, traditional Role-Playing Game from the company and was released on the Super Nintendo in 1993 in Japan, and 1994 in English-speaking territories.

In Breath of Fire you control a young boy called Ryu – one of the last of an ancient race with the ability to turn into dragons – searching for his lost sister. It’s an epic adventure, told using overhead, 2D backgrounds and sprites, with cut-aways to an isometric viewpoint for combat.

Combat initiates randomly when exploring the overworld map, and is both beautifully simple, and perfectly-timed. If you love level-grinders the turn-based, party-driven, grinder-y style of combat in this will probably please you. In fact: Breath of Fire – as a whole – will probably please you. It is a pleasure to play from start to finish. Great attention to detail; tons of variety; solid gameplay.

An even better sequel came out a year later. As a pair of JRPGs, the first two Breath of Fires are a formidable presence in retro gaming history.

More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breath_of_Fire_(video_game)